Sunday, July 31, 2016

Trending Off the Shoulder




I am enjoying a quiet week at Bald Head Island with bookend weekend visits from family.   It's hot as hades here and even the ocean breeze is no match for the Carolina heat.


There are no cars on the island and only golf carts and bikes to get around. It's just the right pace for me and there's no place I'd rather be!


My usual beach look is wild-haired and makeup free in an old knit dress.  Occasionally my Southern heritage kicks in and I feel compelled to get moderately "dolled up." I selected the Style Arc Cara for my on-trend off the shoulder look.


I cut a size 8, though I wish I had sewed the 6 as the neckline could be a smidge tighter. The blue cotton is from Gail K Fabrics in Atlanta. The white contrast shirting is a B&J scrap from my husband's shirts. The lace is from M&J Trimmings:  3.5 yards of the wider lace for the hem and neckline band and 1 yard of the smaller lace for the sleeve caps.

I originally lengthened the front and back pieces by 16 inches to make a dress.  As soon as I sewed it up I knew I had a potential wadder on my hands.  Wadder status was confirmed when my husband innocently asked if I was going for the "Robin Hood's merry men" look.  I tried belting the dress, but the Robin Hood jokes didn't cease...

                         

To salvage the dress, I cut off 16 inches and made it into the top intended by the pattern.

The front neckline piece (which is attached to the sleeves and top front) is interfaced and elastic is only inserted on the back neckline piece to ensure no wardrobe malfunctions. Before attaching the white neckline to the blue top, I sewed the back neckline to the front neckline at the side seams and pressed open the seam allowances.  I sewed the elastic on each side to the back neckline seam allowance. See the stitching in blue below.

                                 

Next, I secured the elastic to the back neckline with a zigzag stitch on the side of the neckline touching my skin, rendering the zigzag invisible from the outside.



From there, I used a typical skirt waistband technique of stitching in the ditch to secure the neckline to the top with a clean finish. 



I enjoyed using lace as an embellishment. Quality RTW lace embellishments usually catapult a RTW garment out of my price range. This makes embellishing me-mades with lace all the more appealing. Yes, it does take extra time and care to sew down the lace, but I think it's worth it!

I sewed the sleeve lace directly on top of the sleeves.


The wider lace is sewn as an insert along the hem of the top.  I used the remaining lace to embellish the front neckline band.



For the first time since our wedding we dined at our reception venue on the island.  The quiet ambience could not have been more different from our boisterous wedding celebration over two years ago, but it was a great evening nonetheless. Perfect for my new beach chic Cara top!


Wish I could stay on "Island Time" forever!   

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Tale of Two Laurels



It's amazing how the same pattern can look so different dependent on the fabric!  I first made the Colette Laurel in lace back in 2014 for my rehearsal dinner. Two years later, at the beginning of summer 2016, I completed a second Laurel in cotton lawn.  While the lace version will always be extra special because I wore it during our wedding weekend, the cotton version has already taken its place as my 2016 "wear it to death" summer dress. Here are the details on both makes:


Guipure Lace Version:


                                       

The guipure lace is from Gorgeous Fabrics.  It's a couture remnant that I snatched up the week after my engagement in January 2013.  I can remember Ann advertising it as normally selling for hundreds of dollars per yard. I paid $50/yard.   No doubt it's couture, as this week I saw the same fabric appear on Susan Khalje's Instagram feed for a wedding gown. The pink silk charmeuse is from B&J.

Guipure is so pretty in the candlelight!

I sewed the silk charmeuse into a full and separate dress, installing the zipper, hemming it, narrow hem at armholes and neck, finishing the seams with the serger, etc.  With the help of an instructor at the now closed Sewing Studio where I took a few lessons, I used the pattern pieces to loosely cut the guipure with very large seam allowances.  The instructor draped the guipure over the silk charmeuse dress on a dressform. We pinned the lace in place and then cut out the excess loosely around the side seams and neck/arm holes.  From there, I did the laborious work of sewing the guipure to the silk by hand.  I never made a lining for the dress, so the hand stitches are still visible on the underside. I decided to cut the lace blunt at the hem.

This is the only full length photo I have from that wonderful evening!


Although the end result was exactly what I was after, I did not use any couture techniques on my couture lace!  Tsk, tsk, tsk. If I am being honest, I am none the wiser if something is couture vs. RTW unless I look inside the garment.   I have been thinking about the couture vs. RTW debate since viewing the showcase piece at the Met's Manus x Machina exhibition: a 2015 Chanel wedding ensemble made of scuba with screen printed embroidery which Lagerfeld described as "haute couture without the couture."


Who would have thought that beautiful fabric was synthetic or that the intricate beading was accomplished with digital technology?  I think it is possible to still appreciate couture work while also questioning the time-honored view that handwork is superior to machine.

Trendsetting? Michael used his umbrella placecard as a matching fascinator!

I loved wearing this dress to our rehearsal dinner, especially with the fascinator I made to accessorize it. Sure it was a little fancy for our beach club rehearsal dinner, but you only get the "I'm the bride" excuse once!

Everyday Cotton Lawn Version:




I have been wearing this dress to death all summer!  I purchased the cotton lawn from B&J in 2010. It was my first visit to B&J and I remember that the fabric was part of a new collection of cotton lawn produced specifically for the store. At about 1/2 the price of Liberty, it felt like a good deal.

Since its inception, the lawn dress was intended to be the wearable muslin for the lace rehearsal dinner version.  I worked out the fitting kinks in the cotton lawn in early 2014, transferred the pattern changes to pattern paper, but never finished the lawn version before going full steam ahead with the lace. As any bride can attest, when the wedding is over you don't want to touch ANYTHING wedding related for months, if not years...

Summer cactus garden at Rockefeller Center
                     
The unfinished lawn dress languished in my UFO drawer until the night before a whirlwind rafting trip to Oregon this past Memorial Day weekend!  Of course.

Hotel bathroom selfie in Portland. I have been wearing the dress with this long cardigan when in A/C.

Perhaps I just wanted to wear a Colette pattern in Portland (where Colette Pattern company is based), or maybe I'm just mad in the head...Either way, finishing this dress was straightforward and only took a few late night hours. I wanted the neckline to be more of a scoop, so I folded the front in half and eyeballed it with scissors. Since the dress is unlined,  I used pre-purchased double fold bias tape to bind the neck and armholes (first time doing this) and installed an invisible zipper.  The dress is a little short on me and I wish I had 1/2 inch more length.



If I make the Laurel again, I will be sure to lower the bust darts a little, add a kick pleat in the back, and add a little length to the dress.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Bombshell Bridesmaid Dress



I am still basking in the great success that was my me-made bridesmaid dress!  

Bridal Party!

The bride, Sara, selected short navy lace bridesmaid dresses for her traditional wedding in our South Carolina hometown.  My DIY wheels started turning when she told me I could choose my own style among the J. Crew leavers lace collection. In October I ordered the Cathleen from J.Crew but returned it shortly thereafter. It didn't fit well and I felt confident I could make something better.



Under the guise of sewing a matching flower girl dress, I emailed J.Crew's "wedding specialist" and procured three yards of the navy lace at $25/yard + tax/shipping.  Can you believe it was that easy? I only wish the rest of the dress-making process was as easy!

The dress  is Burdastyle (5/2011 #122A).  I mostly used the instructions in Gertie's Bombshell dress course (no longer available on Craftsy).


I planned to sew a test dress (the "jungle dress") for a New Year's Eve wedding.  I failed to meet deadline and resurrected a pink and gold brocade me-made to wear instead.  Throughout January, I continued to work on the jungle dress but ran into issues practically every step of the way.

I LOVE this fabric!  A Marchesa silk organza purchased from Gorgeous Fabrics several years ago.


As of this writing, the jungle dress is still incomplete but it allowed me to work out so many of the kinks before cutting into the blue lace for the bridesmaid dress.  2016 Holiday Party dress, perhaps?

Fitting the Bodice Pattern:

I muslined the bombshell bodice two years ago with the intent of sewing it for my rehearsal dinner dress. During this initial muslin stage I made minor adjustments that I now recognize as echoing the adjustments necessary for bramaking:  1) I graded the side of the cup to accommodate more cup volume, as I am between a B and C cup and  2) I added extra coverage at the top of the breast to the upper cup.  I still think I could add a bit more coverage as the final dress is borderline too revealing for conservative me.

In keeping with the vintage style, the Burda pattern was drafted with a fairly low waistline.  I look better with a raised waistline (empire).  After I had sewn the separate bodice and skirt on the jungle dress, Sharon pinned me in and we identified a new waistline.

Skirt is pinned into the bodice with new raised waistline  

I removed the dress from my body very carefully and immediately used a contrasting silk thread to mark the new seamline along the bodice.  I transferred this to the paper pattern by laying the fashion fabric on top of the paper and drawing in the new line.  As you can see from the photo below, the new waistline curves a great deal.




Sewing the Bodice:

Before cutting into the blue lace, I laboriously hand basted the three layers that became the fashion fabric: J. Crew leavers lace, navy silk georgette (Chic Fabrics), and silk organza (Susan Khalje).

Hand basting the 3 layers with silk thread (every 3-5 inches) and using candles (my go-to) as pattern weights

Once the three fabrics were acting as one, I cut out all dress pieces.  I had constructed the jungle dress with no seam allowances and thread traced seamlines.  I am not a big fan of this no seam allowances couture method and fail to see how it ensures more precision than a regular seam allowance.  So I added a 5/8" seam allowance for purposes of sewing the lace dress.

Ready to cut--Only used a little over a yard for the dress itself!

Right before starting to sew the bodice pieces together in the lace dress, I decided to add an additional layer of stability to all bodice pieces (minus the cups) in a quilting cotton.This means that the bodice is comprised of 4 layers (excluding lining):  lace, silk georgette, silk organza, quilting cotton.  Perhaps the cotton layer was not necessary, but I don't regret it.

Sewing the bodice pieces together was fairly straightforward.  Attaching the cups to the bodice took a good deal of patience and lots of hand basting.




Bodice Cups

The cups are a bit fiddly.  Gertie's instructions require that you pad out the bodice cups with needle punch or cotton batting.  This process is largely done by hand. I added an additional layer of batting to all three pieces of the cups on the blue lace dress to provide more shape. I still think I could have padded them a bit more in the upper cup.  When I complete the jungle dress, I will add a third layer of needlepunch to the upper cup.




Bodice Boning and Lining:

Using a light blue printed silk (Chic Fabrics) I sewed the lining in full prior to making the dress.  I picked up this sewing-the-lining-first tip from the Gorgeous Fabrics Blog.    I'm glad I did it, because it definitely helped me push through and avoid what Ann calls "lining fatigue."




In hindsight, I regret choosing this print. In spite of edge stitching the lining to the seam allowance and tacking it down by hand, the lining did start to peak out of the top of the dress along the cups, as you can see in the photo below.

Sisters!


I credit my mom in full for cutting all the boning in the days before the wedding.  The boning was inserted into the lining along every seam, two pieces on the diagonal from the side seam down toward the center front, as well as two final pieces close to the zipper.  That's eleven pieces of boning in total!  Per the instructions, no boning was inserted into the cups.

I sourced additional spiral steel tips and white casing from Daytona Trimmings.  Unfortunately, I bought the wrong size tips and didn't realize it until I was already in South Carolina.  Mom to the rescue – My mom removed the existing tips, cut the boning with pliers (it's not easy) and then reinserted the tips before sliding the boning into the casing.  Next time I make this dress, I will be sure to leave a bit of extra margin for the casing.

The Skirt:

I had MANY problems with the skirt in the jungle dress! I had originally cut out the skirt pieces in the jungle dress to make the Burdastyle sarong style skirt.  But I quickly realized that the silk organza did not have the proper hand to be flattering in the sarong style.  In the picture below you can see where I barely squeezed a straight skirt front out of the bias cut sarong piece.



Finishing:

While I had dutifully followed Gertie's directions for more than half the construction, when it came to finishing the dress I was low on time, patience, and everything in between.  My RTW finishing deviated a bit from Gertie's couture methods. In particular, I joined the skirt to bodice by machine instead of using fell stitches per Gertie's instructions.  Further, I opted for an invisible zipper instead of the vintage lapped zipper that Gertie favors. Finally, I used twill tape instead of petersham for the waist stay.

With the bride before the ceremony


Bolero



In the interest of taking the bombshell out of the bombshell, I selected Vintage Vogue 8812 for a simple bolero to cover my shoulders in the church.  I cut out the bolero pattern pieces before flying home and my mom sewed it up two days before the wedding.   (Yes, Maman to the rescue AGAIN.)  Luckily, she had previously made the same pattern for herself in the same size.  In fact she also wore it to the wedding!

Different fabric, same bolero!

The bolero pattern does not include instructions for a lining.  Instead, it has facings.  Maman sewed the lining separately, trimmed it down, and then attached it to the facings by hand.  She also angled the bust darts down about an inch.  The size 8 bolero fit properly, but if I make it again I will use a size 10 for my back and retain the size 8 in the front.



It was a special dress for a special celebration.  Easily the biggest sewing challenge I have ever undertaken!  I felt so much more confident in this dress than I ever did in the J. Crew version and am very proud of the construction throughout.  Still not the best testament to my time management skills, but I guess that's par for the course when you have a full time job/full life and still commit to a hobby!  I was absolutely down to the wire to finish and couldn't have done so without my Mom's help.

Family photo with the bride and groom! 

best friends + husbands = my NYC family!


Thursday, April 21, 2016

NYC Sewing Meet Up: Manus x Machina @ the Met



It's almost here!!! The Met Costume Institute's Spring exhibition, Manus x Machina: Fashion in an age of Technology opens May 3rd. The exhibition highlights the tension between machine made (Ready to Wear) and handmade (haute couture) and explores how technology has upended the time-honored view of handmade's superiority.   The exhibition will include reproductions of couture workrooms, as well as 150+ garments and objects.  Video preview of the show here.

I would like to invite you to visit the exhibition with me on Saturday, May 14  +  a post-exhibition lunch  and opportunity to meet other local sewists.

Please RSVP to me at domesticcoquinette@gmail.com by Friday, May 6.  I look forward to meeting you and connecting over our shared passion!

-Claire (aka Domestic Coquinette)

                                   Schedule of Meet Up Events:

10am: Meet on the North corner of the front steps facing 5th Ave (side closest to 85th St)
 Metropolitan Museum of Art (1000 Fifth Avenue

  • We will plan to visit the galleries from 10am-12:30pm. You are of course welcome to stay for however short or long you would like, or hop to other galleries.  (Could be a good opportunity to visit the Vigee LeBrun exhibition if you haven't already. It is closing on May 15.)
  • Note on ticket price:  Please bring $ for admission.  Admission to the Met is pay as you wish, with the suggested ticket price of $25.  Official ticketing details from the Met are here.  (For unofficial details on why you should not pay the suggested ticket price, see this Atlantic article.  You're welcome 😀)

1pm – 4pm: Drop in for lunch and post-exhibition schmoozing at Claire's in the Upper West Side

  • Note on food:  Please be my guest for a tea party style lunch (scones, tea sandwiches, assorted desserts, etc.) It may be dainty, but it will be plentiful!  Vegetarian options will be provided.  
  • Note on location: My apartment is a 15 minute walk west across Central Park from the Met (5 minutes by crosstown bus).  Address and directions provided when you RSVP to me directly.  


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Please RSVP to Claire at domesticcoquinette@gmail.com 
by Friday, May 6 

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P.S.  Feel free to share the meet up details with others in the sewing community via Instagram, blog, word of mouth, etc.

Monday, April 4, 2016

Asaka Kimono in Paradise



I recently returned from an epic vacation to Vietnam including four tropical nights in the Gulf of Thailand.   Phu Quoc Island is known for its white sand beaches, crystal blue waters, and red dirt roads roaming with cattle and wild ridgeback dogs.  Freedomland -- our aptly named jungle resort -- was a little piece of heaven!  

Sunset on Ong Lang Beach

What better occasion to sew a special garment than Freedomland's famous communal dinners in the jungle!

Yes, I took this picture!  Amazing 4 course dinners every night at Freedomland.

I decided to go big and bold with the Asaka Kimono by Named Pattern Company.  There was no turning back when I saw Closet Case Files' beautiful cotton version!


I am pretty happy with how mine turned out!

In our thatch room bungalow at Freedomland




The silk charmeuse is from Chic Fabrics.  Chic has a great selection of colorful prints at $15/yard.  Highly recommend when in the NYC Garment District.

Cutting this out was challenging.  With previous silk projects I laboriously hand basted the fabric to medical paper to ensure a precise cut.  At Sonja's suggestion, I tried the new-to-me method of laying the silk out in a single layer on muslin before cutting.  Presto!  The muslin adhered to the silk and the cut pieces were more or less precise. Because of the slippery fabric, I sewed with a microtex needle and my walking foot.


The slits at the juncture of the open sleeves were a little bit tricky to hem because they met at a french seam, but I figured it out by clipping at the juncture of the french seam and slit.


In lieu of the iron-on interfacing recommended by the pattern, I used silk organza to interface the collar.  Next time I will try self-fabric for the collar interfacing.  I chose not to interface the belt.

                                           


                                  

The sleeves are set in the round and I had to run some gathering stitches to get the sleeve to fit into the shoulder. This probably wasn't the fault of the pattern drafting.  I think the fabric probably stretched since I forgot to staystitch the curves.

Since indie patterns are more expensive than the Big 4, I had higher expectations of the overall experience. This pattern should have been drafted for french seams. Period.  The seam allowance was only 3/8",   so I took the extra time to add 1/4"  so that I could make french seams. Also,  the instructions  were quite minimal and the cutting layout was only for 60".  I had a scant 4 yards of 45" fabric and spent a head scratching hour maneuvering the 14 individual pattern pieces into a workable layout for 45".


I do wish that I could get the hem to fall evenly and keep the skirt from riding up in every which direction and clinging.  I have a hunch that a lot of these problems would be solved if I used a cotton.
 

Pesky imperfections aside, this make was a real confidence builder.  Working at a steady rhythm, I completed the garment over about 6 days.  Each day I had a new goal and for the most part I accomplished everything on the day that I set out to do it. Maybe my good sewing juju has finally arrived?